Strategic flood management

2. Flood Management Strategy

The Local Flood Risk Management Strategy was adopted in 2013. In this we set out how we and other agencies work together to improve management of local flood risk.

Over the winter 2013/14, there was extensive flooding across the county. This meant that the strategy did not reflect the present situation. In April 2015, Buckinghamshire County Council, along with other Lead Local Flood Authorities gained some new statutory responsibilities for responding to the drainage aspects of planning applications for major developments. During 2015, The Strategic Flood Management Committee took the decision to revise the Strategy.

Local Flood Risk Management Strategy (PDF)

 

What does local flood risk include?

Local flooding concerns:

  • surface runoff from intense rainfall
  • groundwater
  • ordinary (usually smaller) watercourses

It's estimated that there could be up to 30,000 properties across Buckinghamshire at risk of flooding from local sources.

Why did we produce this strategy?

To manage flood risk more effectively and consistently, the Flood and Water Management Act was passed in 2010.

The Act requires the Lead Local Flood Authority (in this case Buckinghamshire County Council) to produce a Local Flood Risk Management Strategy. This strategy brings together flood information from risk management authorities and the general public.

What is in the strategy?

The strategy seeks to explain the current understanding of flood risk across the county.

The Local Flood Risk Strategy will ensure development does not increase flood risk. This will promote the use of sustainable drainage techniques. It identifies 8 principles which the Strategic Flood Management team will work to over the next 5 years.

Review Process

The Strategy’s Action Plan is reviewed every year.

The Local Flood Risk Management Strategy will be reviewed in April 2022, as it follows a six year review cycle. The Strategy is owned by the Buckinghamshire Strategic Flood Management Committee.

 

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Last updated: 12 March 2019

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