Buckinghamshire Libraries launching new scheme to support people living with long term conditions

Published
30.06.2017
news

Launching on Monday 3 July 2017, Reading Well for long term conditions is a recommended reading list of 28 books that were selected by health experts and people living with long term conditions. The list includes health information, memoir and self-management titles and covers conditions such as diabetes, stroke and heart disease, as well as common symptoms such as fatigue, pain, wellbeing and sleep problems.

Developed with health experts and people living with long term conditions and their carers, the new Reading Well scheme encourages people to take an active role in making decisions about their health and understanding and managing a range of long term their conditions.

Reading Well for long term conditions is part of the successful Reading Well Books on Prescription programme delivered through English public libraries. It provides people living with long term conditions and their carers with high-quality book based information, support and advice on a range of conditions.  On average people living with long term conditions spend just four hours a year with a health professional and 8,756 hours self-managing[1]. There is therefore an enormous need for accessible, quality assured health information to help people understand and manage their symptoms.

Visit Reading Well - books to help your health and wellbeing  to find out more about health collections in Buckinghamshire.


[1] Long Term Conditions Metrics, NHS England, 2016

The scheme is delivered by The Reading Agency in partnership with the Society of Chief Librarians and it is delivered through English public libraries. It is funded by Arts Council England and the Wellcome Trust. It is supported by a range of health organisations including Public Health England, Health Education England, Self Management UK and The Richmond Group of Charities and has been co-produced with people with lived experience with the support of the Coalition of Collaborative Care.

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